Mom, Can I download this App?

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by: Andy Lawrenson

08/27/2020

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If you’re a parent and you have kids with screens, then you probably would like to know what apps they’re downloading. . .or better yet. . .you probably would like to help them learn to become screen-wise and avoid dangerous apps.

And there lies the question. How are we supposed to know what’s dangerous, and then, in turn pass on that knowledge to them?

Take the app Housparty, for example. On one hand this is a fun app families can use especially now to communicate and play fun games while quarantined together. But if young people don’t set their privacy settings correctly, they’ll have to navigate encounters with strangers.

“Strangers.”

I said it.

Just saying the world “strangers” divides the generations today. Most parents grew up with school assemblies teaching us “stranger danger!” We don’t like the idea of some 46-year-old naked guy sitting in his mom’s basement “friending” our kid. And believe me…he’s there.

But most of Gen Z has grown up seeing “strangers” as potential followers, and in a world where 86% of Gen Z wants to be an influencer, this is the lens in which they navigate all social media. I need more followers so I can be a YouTube star! (you’ll be seeing more from me on this soon) So when they get a friend request from Ted Bundy. . .it’s just one more potential follower.

This makes dialogue with our kids vital today.

We can’t just slap down rules and tell our kids what they can and can’t download. We need to get to the “why” behind it.

So let’s say your 11-year-old daughter already has a smartphone or tablet (the majority of them do) and asks you if she can have the app Houseparty. . .and you know nothing about it. What do you do?

You can read more HERE from Jonathan McKee.

If you’re a parent and you have kids with screens, then you probably would like to know what apps they’re downloading. . .or better yet. . .you probably would like to help them learn to become screen-wise and avoid dangerous apps.

And there lies the question. How are we supposed to know what’s dangerous, and then, in turn pass on that knowledge to them?

Take the app Housparty, for example. On one hand this is a fun app families can use especially now to communicate and play fun games while quarantined together. But if young people don’t set their privacy settings correctly, they’ll have to navigate encounters with strangers.

“Strangers.”

I said it.

Just saying the world “strangers” divides the generations today. Most parents grew up with school assemblies teaching us “stranger danger!” We don’t like the idea of some 46-year-old naked guy sitting in his mom’s basement “friending” our kid. And believe me…he’s there.

But most of Gen Z has grown up seeing “strangers” as potential followers, and in a world where 86% of Gen Z wants to be an influencer, this is the lens in which they navigate all social media. I need more followers so I can be a YouTube star! (you’ll be seeing more from me on this soon) So when they get a friend request from Ted Bundy. . .it’s just one more potential follower.

This makes dialogue with our kids vital today.

We can’t just slap down rules and tell our kids what they can and can’t download. We need to get to the “why” behind it.

So let’s say your 11-year-old daughter already has a smartphone or tablet (the majority of them do) and asks you if she can have the app Houseparty. . .and you know nothing about it. What do you do?

You can read more HERE from Jonathan McKee.

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